Is rejection of moral absolutes emotional rather than intellectual?

courtesy of GlosgowAmateur via flickr.com
courtesy of GlosgowAmateur via flickr.com

In the last several posts, I have tried to paint a picture showing that without God, morality is entirely subjective.  Thus, without God, differences in moral standards are no more that differences in personal preferences.

  • If societies get to define morality, then war is not right or wrong.  It’s merely a struggle for power.
  • If morals are defined by how a family raises their children, then there is nothing wrong when a family raises their kids to be cop killers.
  • If individuals each get to decide their own morality, then there is no instance in which any person is justified in condemning the attitudes or actions of another.

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Gently and respectfully challenging how people define wrong and right.

image courtesy of Andi Jetaime via flickr.com
                                                image courtesy of Andi Jetaime via flickr.com

After doing a very quick internet search for how people decide right and wrong, I found that there are many, many such discussions.  The majority of responses I saw could be divided into three themes:

  • We know what is right and wrong based on the way we were raised.
  • Everyone gets to determine right and wrong for themselves.
  • Right and wrong just exist and we don’t need religion or anyone else to tell us what is right and wrong.

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Does morality based in evolution make sense?

Breezy Brie on Morals

image from  http://dailyatheistquote.com/atheist-quotes/2013/01/18/breezy-brie-on-morals/

Several years ago I attended a debate about between an atheist and a Christian about Intelligent Design.  The two participants were Michael Ruse and William Dembski.  Part of the debate included whether or not there were moral absolutes.

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Who gets to make the rules? Searching for the basis of morality.

Photo copyright 2011 by J Ronald Lee
Photo copyright 2011 by J Ronald Lee 

During college I was introduced to the game shown in the picture above.  Some of the guys that lived on my dorm floor would have regular Axis and Allies game nights.  Each game would take about thirty minutes to set up and playing the game took a minimum of four or five hours. I  now play this game from time to time with my sons, and when we do we have a great time because we all understand how the game works and we each follow the rules.

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Start an apologetics conversation – Are people basically good or basically evil?

 

image courtesy of Ariane Middel via flickr.com
image courtesy of Ariane Middel via flickr.com

Not long ago, I attended a mandatory employees’ conference.  This conference emphasized the investigative arm of the law enforcement agency for which I work.  Much of the material dealt with violent crimes people commit against one another.  At the end of the two-day event, I was emotionally spent.  Continue reading

The Moral Basis of Forensic Science

At the site of the Murrah Federal Building Memorial in Oklahoma City. photo courtesy of meltedplastic via flickr.com
At the site of the Murrah Federal Building Memorial in Oklahoma City.
photo courtesy of meltedplastic via flickr.com

I have worked in forensic science for almost all of my professional career – approaching twenty years.   While my work is in the lab, I have been to homicide scenes and methamphetamine labs, arson scenes and officer-involved shootings.  In the chemistry lab I have worked thousands of cases involving illegal drugs and impaired driving.  Many of the impaired driving cases were wrecks in which Continue reading